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Corn Syrup in Beer: It’s For Fermenting, Not As a Sweetener
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Bud Light is touting that it doesn’t use corn syrup, but that doesn’t make it nutritionally much different from its competitors.

Sweeteners and starches can be used in the fermenting process to make beers, even if little remains in the end product. In fact, 12-ounce cans of Bud Light and Miller Lite list zero grams of sugar, while Coors Light lists 1 gram. Each has around 100 calories, with carbs ranging from about 3 to 7 grams.

Bud Light uses rice instead of corn syrup in its fermenting process, but does it matter what type of starch or sweetener is used?

Harry Schuhmacher, editor of Beer Business Daily, said the fermenting aids used to make lighter beers might result in slight differences in taste, but they generally serve the same purpose. “You could use doughnuts if you wanted,” Schumacher said.

Bud Light parent company Anheuser-Busch makes other beers that list corn syrup as an ingredient.

Categories Corporations Fact Check Food Interesting

Tags Advertising Beer Brewing Budlight Corn Craft Beer Fructose InBev Super Bowl


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